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City of Boston launches Boston.gov on Drupal

Drupal.org News - Thu, 07/21/2016 - 18:00

Republished from buytaert.net

Yesterday, the City of Boston launched its new website, Boston.gov, on Drupal. Not only is Boston a city well-known around the world, it has also become my home over the past 9 years. That makes it extra exciting to see the city of Boston use Drupal.

As a company headquartered in Boston, I'm also extremely proud to have Acquia involved with Boston.gov. The site is hosted on Acquia Cloud, and Acquia led a lot of the architecture, development, and coordination. I remember pitching the project in the basement of Boston's City Hall, so seeing the site launched less than a year later is quite exciting.

The project was a big undertaking, as the old website was 10 years old and running on Tridion. The city's digital team, Acquia, IDEO, Genuine Interactive, and others all worked together to reimagine how a government can serve its citizens better digitally. It was an ambitious project as the whole website was redesigned from scratch in 11 months; from creating a new identity, to interviewing citizens, to building, testing and launching the new site.

Along the way, the project relied heavily on feedback from a wide variety of residents. The openness and transparency of the whole process was refreshing. Even today, the city made its roadmap public at http://roadmap.boston.gov and is actively encouraging citizens to submit suggestions. This open process is one of the many reasons why I think Drupal is such a good fit for Boston.gov.

More than 20,000 web pages and one million words were rewritten in a more human tone to make the site easier to understand and navigate. For example, rather than organize information primarily by department (as is often the case with government websites), the new site is designed around how residents think about an issue, such as moving, starting a business or owning a car. Content is authored, maintained, and updated by more than 20 content authors across 120 city departments and initiatives.

The new Boston.gov is absolutely beautiful, welcoming and usable. And, like any great technology endeavor, it will never stop improving. The City of Boston has only just begun its journey with Boston.gov—I’m excited see how it grows and evolves in the years to come. Go Boston!

Last night, there was a launch party to celebrate the launch of Boston.gov. It was an honor to give some remarks about this project alongside Boston mayor, Marty Walsh (pictured above), as well as Lauren Lockwood (Chief Digital Officer of the City of Boston) and Jascha Franklin-Hodge (Chief Information Officer of the City of Boston).

Drupal 8.1.7 released

Drupal.org News - Mon, 07/18/2016 - 15:00

Drupal 8.1.7, a maintenance release which contains fixes for security vulnerabilities, is now available for download.

See the Drupal 8.1.7 release notes for further information.

Download Drupal 8.1.7

Upgrading your existing Drupal 8 sites is strongly recommended. There are no new features nor non-security-related bug fixes in this release. For more information about the Drupal 8.1.x release series, consult the Drupal 8 overview.

Security information

We have a security announcement mailing list and a history of all security advisories, as well as an RSS feed with the most recent security advisories. We strongly advise Drupal administrators to sign up for the list.

Drupal 8 includes the built-in Update Manager module, which informs you about important updates to your modules and themes.

Bug reports

Drupal 8.1.x is actively maintained, so more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.

Change log

Drupal 8.1.7 is a security release only. For more details, see the 8.1.7 release notes. A complete list of all changes in the stable 8.1.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Security vulnerabilities

Drupal 8.1.7 was released in response to the discovery of security vulnerabilities. Details can be found in the official security advisories:

To fix the security problem, please upgrade to Drupal 8.1.7.

Update notes

See the 8.1.7 release notes for details on important changes in this release.

Known issues

See the 8.1.7 release notes for known issues.

Drupal Core - Highly Critical - Injection - SA-CORE-2016-003

Drupal.org News - Mon, 07/18/2016 - 14:53
Description

Drupal 8 uses the third-party PHP library Guzzle for making server-side HTTP requests. An attacker can provide a proxy server that Guzzle will use. The details of this are explained at https://httpoxy.org/.

CVE identifier(s) issued
  • CVE-2016-5385
Versions affected
  • Drupal core 8.x versions prior to 8.1.7
Solution

Install the latest version:

  • If you use Drupal 8.x, upgrade to Drupal core 8.1.7
  • If you use Drupal 7.x, Drupal core is not affected. However you should consider using the mitigation steps at https://httpoxy.org/ since you might have modules or other software on your server affected by this issue. For example, sites using Apache can add the following code to .htaccess:
    <IfModule mod_headers.c> RequestHeader unset Proxy </IfModule>

We also suggest mitigating it as described here: https://httpoxy.org/

Also see the Drupal core project page.

What if I am running Drupal core 8.0.x?

Drupal core 8.0.x is no longer supported. Update to 8.1.7 to get the latest security and bug fixes.

Why is this being released Monday rather than Wednesday?

The Drupal Security Team usually releases Security Advisories on Wednesdays. However, this vulnerability affects more than Drupal, and the authors of Guzzle and reporters of the issue coordinated to make it public Monday. Therefore, we are issuing a core release to update to the secure version of Guzzle today.

Contact and More Information

The Drupal security team can be reached at security at drupal.org or via the contact form at https://www.drupal.org/contact.

Learn more about the Drupal Security team and their policies, writing secure code for Drupal, and securing your site.

Follow the Drupal Security Team on Twitter at https://twitter.com/drupalsecurity

Front page news: Planet DrupalDrupal version: Drupal 8.x

Drupal 8.x core release on Monday -- PSA-2016-002

Drupal.org News - Sun, 07/17/2016 - 17:54
  • Advisory ID: DRUPAL-PSA-2016-002
  • Project: Drupal
  • Version: 8.x
  • Date: 2016-July-17
  • Security risk: TBD
  • Vulnerability: TBD
Description

We will be doing a Drupal 8 core patch release on Monday, July 18th. This will occur between 14:15 UTC and 19:00 UTC.

There will not be a Drupal 7 release during this window.

Why is this release being issued?

The Drupal security team has learned that a third-party Drupal 8 dependency will be making a security release on Monday, July 18th and in accordance we will be making a Drupal 8 release soon after. We will not disclose details of the third-party update in advance of that release and cannot respond to requests for further information. This security release is for the dependency only and does not affect Drupal 7 sites. Other mitigating factors will be included with our published SA.

What about the regularly scheduled release window on Wednesday, July 20?

We are moving the regularly scheduled window two days earlier to provide the third-party dependency update, so this replaces that window.

There will not be another core release on Wednesday, July 20th.

Contact and More Information

The Drupal security team can be reached at security at drupal.org or via the contact form at https://www.drupal.org/contact.

Learn more about the Drupal Security team and their policies, writing secure code for Drupal, and securing your site.

Follow the Drupal Security Team on Twitter at https://twitter.com/drupalsecurity

Drupal version: Drupal 8.x

What’s new on Drupal.org? - June 2016

Drupal.org News - Fri, 07/15/2016 - 16:20

Read our Roadmap to understand how this work falls into priorities set by the Drupal Association with direction and collaboration from the Board and community.

In June the Drupal Association had our annual staff retreat, where the remote team members joined the Portland, OR team for a three day retreat. This year's retreat was particularly important as we found our feet as a smaller, leaner team, and focused on our organizational roadmap for the next twelve months.

For the engineering team in particular, our focus will be on maintaining the critical systems that make project successful: issue queues, updates, testing, packaging, etc, while at the same time finding new ways to support and enable Drupal's evolution.

These were some heady days, but even as we worked through the best ways to continue serving the Drupal community on a strategic level in June, we also found the time to keep making Drupal.org a better home.

Drupal.org updates Documentation Migration

A long running initiative this year has been the creation of a new Documentation system for Drupal.org, a topic we've touched on in many prior updates as it has begun to come online. We are very happy to say that we are moving to the next stage of the documentation project: moving from development to migration.

In June tvn recruited several volunteers to join our documentation migration team, and to become some of the first maintainers for the new Documentation Guides. General documentation, such as Understanding Drupal, Structure Guide, etc. will be migrated first. Documentation for contributed projects will follow in the coming weeks.

Maintainers of contributed projects, who currently have their documentation on Drupal.org, will be added as maintainers to respective documentation guides and are encouraged to clean/tidy up their documentation post-migration.

if you are interested in helping, or sign up as a maintainer for some of the new documentation guides.

Composer Repositories are now in Beta

Drupal.org's Composer repositories allow developers building sites with Drupal to use the Composer command line tool for dependency management. In June we collected feedback from a variety of users, as well as the community volunteers who assisted us with the Composer Community Initiative.

We spent the month iterating quickly on the alpha implementation: fixing bugs and rebuilding the meta data to ensure that users get consistent and expected results. Because of those fixes, and after gathering yet more feedback from the community, we were able to move the Drupal.org Composer repositories to beta.

We encourage you to begin transitioning your composer based workflows to use Drupal.org's composer facade. Package names are stable, and downtimes will be planned and announced. For more information on how to use Drupal.org's Composer repositories, read our documentation.

Better issue credit tools for maintainers

The Drupal.org issue credit system is a unique innovation of our community. By allowing users to attribute their contributions as volunteers, to their employers, or to client customers, we have an insight into the contribution ecosystem for Drupal that is unparalleled among open source projects. We've also already seen the impact of incentivizing organizations to give back to Drupal, by using the credit system as the basis for organization rankings in the marketplace.

In June we added two new tools for maintainers to improve how they grant credit to users. Firstly, maintainers can now deselect the automatic credit attribution for users who have submitted patches. This change was important to prevent gaming the credit system. Secondly, we've given the maintainers the ability to credit users who have not commented in the issue. Whether that help was provided in IRC, Slack, on a video call, or in a sprint room, maintainers can now ensure that those users who helped resolve an issue receive credit for their contributions. Any user who is credited this way can edit their credit attribution if they want to extend that attribution to a supporting organization or customer.

Friendly path aliases for release nodes

We also made a relatively small change that will have a big impact. Path auto is now enabled for project releases, so you for any project a specific release can now be found at:
drupal.org/project/[project_name]/releases/[version]
And you can also find a list of all the releases for a project at:
drupal.org/project/[project_name]/releases/

Take, for example, the Token module:
https://drupal.org/project/token/

You can find the complete index of releases for this project at: https://www.drupal.org/project/token/releases and individual releases now have friendly urls, like this one: https://www.drupal.org/project/token/releases/8.x-1.0-alpha2

Spam Fighting Improvements

Fighting spam on Drupal.org is a never ending battle, but in June we deployed a refinement to our spam fighting tools that helps us to find patterns in registration behavior and prevent spam registrations before they've even started. After flipping on our latest iteration of this spam fighting tool we saw an immediate and dramatic drop-off in suspicious account registrations. With the additional data we've been able to collect we already see ways to improve this even further, so we hope to continue make Drupal.org a cleaner home for the community.

Highlighting Supporting Technologies

Drupal is many things to many different people, but one central function of Drupal is to be the hub of interconnected and complementary technologies. Several of the companies that build these technologies have chosen to support the Drupal project by becoming supporters. To better highlight some of these supporting technologies that work well with Drupal, we've added a supporting technologies listing to the marketplace.

Sustaining support and maintenance DrupalCon

DrupalCon Dublin is coming up soon, from September 26 - 30th. This year we smashed all our previous records for session submissions, and the caliber of speakers and topics is higher than ever before.

In June we opened registration for the event. We encourage you to buy your tickets now! Early bird registration will end soon.

Infrastructure

Infrastructure is the bedrock of Drupal.org - and we're continuing to tune the infrastructure for efficiency, economy, and performance. Alongside the launch of registration for DrupalCon Dublin, we implemented APDQC to improve the performance of the Events website under heavy load.

We've also been upgrading our configuration management from Puppet 3 to Puppet 4, and continuing to standardize our configuration across all of our environments to make our infrastructure durable, consistent, and portable.

———

As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who made it possible for us to work on these projects.

If you would like to support our work as an individual or an organization, consider becoming a member of the Drupal Association.

Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

Drupal contrib - Highly Critical - Remote code execution PSA-2016-001

Drupal.org News - Tue, 07/12/2016 - 16:18
Update: Release Annoucements

The following modules have security releases that are now available, listed in order of severity. There are no more releases planned for today.

Description

There will be multiple releases of Drupal contributed modules on Wednesday July 13th 2016 16:00 UTC that will fix highly critical remote code execution vulnerabilities (risk scores up to 22/25). These contributed modules are used on between 1,000 and 10,000 sites. The Drupal Security Team urges you to reserve time for module updates at that time because exploits are expected to be developed within hours/days. Release announcements will appear at the standard announcement locations.

Drupal core is not affected. Not all sites will be affected. You should review the published advisories on July 13th 2016 to see if any modules you use are affected.

Contact and More Information

The Drupal security team can be reached at security at drupal.org or via the contact form at https://www.drupal.org/contact.

Learn more about the Drupal Security team and their policies, writing secure code for Drupal, and securing your site.

Follow the Drupal Security Team on Twitter at https://twitter.com/drupalsecurity

Edited to add: approximate usage of the modules, links to the final releases, that there are no more releases for today..

Drupal version: Drupal 7.x

Aegan

Drupal Themes News - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 13:06

Aegan is a Responsive bootstrap based drupal 8 business theme, ts very light weight with modern look and feel. Business's clean layout and light weight code make it a great theme for small or medium-sized business to get up and running quickly.

Live Demo | More Themes Features :
  1. Based on Bootstrap
  2. Customizable Slideshow
  3. Customizable Social icons
  4. Font awesome support
  5. Support Multi-level menu
  6. Available in 8 colors
Enable Multi-level Menus :

There is two important configuration to enable the multi-level menus in drupal,
1. Enable "Show as expanded" option in the parent menu item
2. Set unlimited on "Maximum number of menu levels to display" in Main navigation block configuration

Live sites :
  1. Gota d'Agua Surf Camp
8.x.1.0 ToDo

1. Some minor css fixes

Credit :

Development of this theme is sponsored by DropThemes.in. For more Drupal qualified themes checkout DropThemes.in Gallery.

Drupal 7.50 released

Drupal.org News - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 19:28

Drupal 7.50, the next release in the Drupal 7 series, is now available for download. It contains a variety of new features, improvements, and bug fixes (no security fixes).

Wait... Drupal 7.50?

Yes, there is a version jump compared to the previous 7.44 release; this is to indicate that this Drupal 7 point release is a bit larger than past ones and makes a few more changes and new features available than normal.

Updating your existing Drupal 7 sites is recommended. Backwards compatibility is still being maintained, although read on to find out about a couple of changes that might need your attention during the update.

Download Drupal 7.50 Notable changes

There are a variety of new features, performance improvements, security-related enhancements (although no fixes for direct security vulnerabilities) and other notable changes in this release. The release notes provide a comprehensive list, but here are some highlights.

New "administer fields" permission added for trusted users

The administrative interface for adding and configuring fields has always been something that only trusted users should have access to. To make that easier, there is now a dedicated permission which is required (in addition to other existing administrative permissions) to be able to access the field UI.

For example, you can now assign the "administer taxonomy" permission (but withhold the new "administer fields" permission) to allow low-level administrators to manage taxonomy terms but not change the field structure. Read the change record for more information.

Protection against clickjacking enabled by default

Clickjacking is a technique a malicious site owner can use to attempt attacks on other sites, by embedding the victim's site into an iframe on their own site.

To stop this, Drupal will now prevent your site from being embedded in an iframe on another domain. This is the default behavior, but it can be adjusted if necessary; see the change record to find out more.

Support for full UTF-8 (emojis, Asian symbols, mathematical symbols) is now possible on MySQL

If content creators on your site have been clamoring to use emojis, it's now possible on Drupal sites running MySQL (it was previously possible on PostgreSQL and SQLite). Turning this capability on requires the database to meet certain requirements, plus editing the site's settings.php file and potentially other steps, as described in the change record.

Improved support for recent PHP versions, including PHP 7

Drupal core's automated test suite is now fully passing on a variety of environments where there were previously some failures (PHP 5.4, 5.5, 5.6, and 7). We have also fixed several bugs affecting those versions. These PHP versions are officially supported by Drupal 7 and recommended for use where possible.

Because PHP 7 is the newest release (and not yet used on many production sites) extra care should still be taken with it, and there are some known bugs, especially in contributed modules (see the discussion for more details). However anecdotal evidence from a variety of users suggests that Drupal 7 can be successfully used on PHP 7, both before and after the 7.50 release.

Improved performance (and new PHP warnings) when Drupal is trying to find a file that does not exist

When Drupal cannot find a file that it expects to be in the filesystem, it will no longer continually search for it on a large number of page requests (previously, this could significantly hurt your site's performance). Instead, it will record a PHP warning about the problem.

Read the change record for more information, and make sure your production site is not configured to show warning messages like this on the screen, since it is not desirable for site visitors to see them. (In order to configure this, go to "Administration" → "Configuration" → "Development" → "Logging and errors" and set the "Error messages to display" option to "None".)

Improvements to help search engines index your site's images/CSS/JavaScript

Modern search engine web crawlers read images, CSS and JavaScript (just like a regular web browser) when crawling a site, and they use this information to improve search results.

Drupal's default robots.txt file now includes rules to allow search engines to access more of these files than it previously allowed them to, which may help certain search engines better index your site. See the change record for additional details.

More information
  • You can find the full list of changes between the previous 7.44 release and the current 7.50 release by reading the 7.50 release notes.
  • Also see the release notes for additional update information and known issues discovered after the release.
  • You can find a complete list of all changes in the stable 7.x branch in the git commit log.
  • Translators should be aware of a few administrative-facing translatable string changes and additions in this release.
Security information Future releases
  • Drupal 7 is being actively maintained, so more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.
  • We will consider continuing to do larger Drupal 7 releases like this one every six months or so (where the next larger release will be 7.60, in keeping with Drupal's new release cycle) if there is interest and continued contributions from the community. See the ongoing discussion for further details.
New Drupal 7 co-mainainers

In case you missed the news earlier, we recently added two new Drupal 7 co-maintainers: Fabianx (@fabianfranz) and stefan.r (@stefan_arrr)! Despite only having been official maintainers for the past two weeks, they put in an enormous amount of effort and skill into Drupal 7.50, which was essential in getting it out the door with all the improvements mentioned above.

Credits

Overall, 230 people were credited with helping to fix issues included in this release:

akoepke, alanburke, Alan D., alberto56, Albert Volkman, alexmoreno, alexpott, amontero, andypost, ar-jan, arosboro, askibinski, attiks, basvredeling, beejeebus, benjy, Berdir, bmateus, borisson_, botris, bradjones1, brianV, broeker, c960657, Carsten Müller, catch, checker, chintan.vyas, chirhotec, Christian DeLoach, ChristophWeber, chx, cilefen, ciss, ckng, colinmccabe, corbacho, criz, cspitzlay, cwoky, dagmar, DamienMcKenna, damien_vancouver, darol100, Darren Oh, das-peter, Dave Reid, davic, david_garcia, David_Rothstein, dawehner, dcam, DerekL, donutdan4114, droplet, DuaelFr, e._s, eesquibel, eiriksm, Elijah Lynn, emcniece, Eric_A, EvanSchisler, ExTexan, Fabianx, felribeiro, fgm, fietserwin, forestgardener, gcardinal, geerlingguy, gielfeldt, Girish-jerk, greggles, GrigoriuNicolae, Gábor Hojtsy, hass, Henrik Opel, heyyo, hgoto, hussainweb, idebr, ifrik, imanol.eguskiza, IRuslan, izaaksom, jackbravo, jacob.embree, jbekker, jbeuckm, jduhls, jenlampton, jeroen.b, jhodgdon, jibran, joachim, joegraduate, joelpittet, johnpicozzi, joseph.olstad, joshtaylor, Josh Waihi, jp.stacey, jsacksick, jthorson, JvE, jweowu, kala4ek, Kars-T, Ken Ficara, kenorb, kevinquillen, Kgaut, KhaledBlah, klausi, klokie, kristiaanvandeneynde, kristofferwiklund, ksenzee, k_zoltan, leschekfm, Liam Morland, lOggOl, lokapujya, Lowell, lucastockmann, Lukas von Blarer, maciej.zgadzaj, marcelovani, mariagwyn, Mark Theunissen, marvin_B8, maximpodorov, mayaz17, MegaChriz, mfb, mgifford, micaelamenara, mikeytown2, Mile23, mimran, minax.de, miro_dietiker, mistermoper, Mixologic, mohit_aghera, mondrake, mpv, mr.baileys, MustangGB, Neograph734, nevergone, nicholas.alipaz, nicrodgers, NikitaJain, nithinkolekar, nod_, Noe_, onelittleant, opdavies, orbmantell, oriol_e9g, ParisLiakos, pashupathi nath gajawada, Peacog, Perignon, Peter Bex, peterpoe, pfrenssen, PieterDC, pietmarcus, pjcdawkins, pjonckiere, Polonium, pounard, presleyd, pwaterz, pwolanin, rafaolf, rbmboogie, realityloop, rhclayto, rocketeerbkw, rpayanm, rupertj, Sagar Ramgade, sanduhrs, scor, scottalan, scuba_fly, sdstyles, snehi, soaratul, SocialNicheGuru, Spleshka, stefan.r, stovak, sun, Sutharsan, svanou, Sweetchuck, swentel, sylus, s_leu, tadityar, talhaparacha, tatisilva, tbradbury, therealssj, travelvc, TravisCarden, TravisJohnston, treyhunner, tsphethean, tstoeckler, tucho, tuutti, twistor, TwoD, typhonius, vasi1186, Wim Leers, Xano, xjm, yannickoo, yched, YesCT, zaporylie, Zerdiox, and znerol.

(This list was auto-generated, so apologies if anyone was left out.)

Your name could be on a list like this in the future; see the Ways to get involved page to find out how.

Thank you to everyone who helped with Drupal 7.50!

A roadmap for making Drupal more API-first

Drupal.org News - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 15:06

Republished from buytaert.net

In one of my recent blog posts, I articulated a vision for the future of Drupal's web services, and at DrupalCon New Orleans, I announced the API-first initiative for Drupal 8. I believe that there is considerable momentum behind driving the web services initiative. As such, I want to provide a progress report, highlight some of the key people driving the work, and map the proposed vision from the previous blog post onto a rough timeline.

Here is a bird's-eye view of the plan for the next twelve months:

8.2 (Q4 2016) 8.3 (Q2 2017) Beyond 8.3 (2017+) New REST API capabilities
Waterwheel initial release New REST API capabilities
JSON API module GraphQL module?
Entity graph iterator? New REST API capabilities

Wim Leers (Acquia) and Daniel Wehner (Chapter Three) have produced a comprehensive list of the top priorities for the REST module. We're introducing significant REST API advancements in Drupal 8.2 and 8.3 in order to improve the developer experience and extend the capabilities of the REST API. We've been focused on configuration entity support, simplified REST configuration, translation and file upload support, pagination, and last but not least, support for user login, logout and registration. All this work starts to address differences between core's REST module and various contributed modules like Services and RELAXed Web Services. More details are available in my previous blog post.

Many thanks to Wim Leers (Acquia), Daniel Wehner (Chapter Three), Ted Bowman (Acquia),Alex Pott (Chapter Three), and others for their work on Drupal core's REST modules. Though there is considerable momentum behind efforts in core, we could always benefit from new contributors. Please consider taking a look at the REST module issue queue to help!

Waterwheel initial release

As I mentioned in my previous post, there has been exciting work surrounding Waterwheel, an SDK for JavaScript developers building Drupal-backed applications. If you want to build decoupled applications using a JavaScript framework (e.g. Angular, Ember, React, etc.) that use Drupal as a content repository, stay tuned for Waterwheel's initial release later this year.

Waterwheel aims to facilitate the construction of JavaScript applications that communicate with Drupal. Waterwheel's JavaScript library allows JavaScript developers to work with Drupal without needing deep knowledge of how requests should be authenticated against Drupal, what request headers should be included, and how responses are molded into particular data structures.

The Waterwheel Drupal module adds a new endpoint to Drupal's REST API allowing Waterwheel to discover entity resources and their fields. In other words, Waterwheel intelligently discovers and seamlessly integrates with the content model defined on any particular Drupal 8 site.

A wider ecosystem around Waterwheel is starting to grow as well. Gabe Sullice, creator of the Entity Query API module, has contributed an integration of Waterwheel which opens the door to features such as sorts, conditions and ranges. The Waterwheel team welcomes early adopters as well as those working on other REST modules such as JSON API and RELAXed or using native HTTP clients in JavaScript frameworks to add their own integrations to the mix.

Waterwheel is the currently the work of Matt Grill (Acquia) and Preston So (Acquia), who are developing the JavaScript library, and Ted Bowman (Acquia), who is working on the Drupal module.

JSON API module

In conjunction with the ongoing efforts in core REST, parallel work is under way to build a JSON API module that embraces the JSON API specification. JSON API is a particular implementation of REST that provides conventions for resource relationships, collections, filters, pagination, and sorting, in addition to error handling and full test coverage. These conventions help developers build clients faster and encourages reuse of code.

Thanks to Mateu Aguiló BoschEd Faulkner and Gabe Sullice, who are spearheading the JSON API module work. The module could be ready for production use by the end of this year and included as an experimental module in core by 8.3. Contributors to JSON API are meeting weekly to discuss progress moving forward.

Beyond 8.3: GraphQL and entity graph iterator

While these other milestones are either certain or in the works, there are other projects gathering steam. Chief among these is GraphQL, which is a query language I highlighted in my Barcelona keynote and allows for clients to tailor the responses they receive based on the structure of the requests they issue.

One of the primary outcomes of the New Orleans web services discussion was the importance of a unified approach to iterating Drupal's entity graph; both GraphQL and JSON API require such an "entity graph iterator." Though much of this is still speculative and needs greater refinement, eventually, such an "entity graph iterator" could enable other functionality such as editable API responses (e.g. aliases for custom field names and timestamp formatters) and a unified versioning strategy for web services. However, more help is needed to keep making progress, and in absence of additional contributors, we do not believe this will land in Drupal until after 8.3.

Thanks to Sebastian Siemssen, who has been leading the effort around this work, which is currently available on GitHub.

Validating our work and getting involved

In order to validate all of the progress we've made, we need developers everywhere to test and experiment with what we're producing. This means stretching the limits of our core REST offerings, trying out JSON API for your own Drupal-backed applications, reporting issues and bugs as you encounter them, and participating in the discussions surrounding this exciting vision. Together, we can build towards a first-class API-first Drupal.

Special thanks to Preston So for contributions to this blog post and to Wim Leers for feedback during its writing.

triculin responsive

Drupal Themes News - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 12:03

triculin responsive is a clean and elegant theme with minimalistic and simple design approach.

Features

  • Responsive Layout
  • 10 Regions
  • Fluid layout
  • Gradient color schemes
  • CSS3 and HTML5
  • Mobile first approach

Semantica

Drupal Themes News - Tue, 07/05/2016 - 09:43
NOT PRODUCTION READY Semantic UI Theme Integration

Theme for integration of http://semantic-ui.com/

Tools used

- nodejs
- bower
- gulp

Features

Helper for adding bower libraries directly to drupal.

bower i bower-library --save

Setup cd semantica npm i bower gulp-cli --global npm run setup gulp Missing

Subtheme skeleton

Corporation - Drupal Business Theme

Drupal Themes News - Mon, 07/04/2016 - 15:50

Corporation is new responsive Drupal website design for business and corporate websites. This Drupal business theme is very light and clean with modern look and suit perfectly for showcasing your work. Responsive design and mobile friendliness makes theme ideal for surfing on the web from different devices - desktops, tablets and mobiles. Corporation includes slideshow with touch function, custom styled elements and working contact form that will help to stay in touch with your customers.

Corporation Drupal business theme has a lot of customization options like social media integration, typography options (Google fonts integration), ability to insert your copyright, options for setting style for links, body and more.

Corporation Drupal business theme is perfect choice for all companies, agencies, small and medium sized corporations. If you are looking for modern Drupal business theme to show your company don't miss Corporation Drupal business theme, you definitely will like it.

Quickstart of Corporation - Drupal Business Theme in which all modules, theme and dummy data are included, is available here. It's easy to install Drupal website in a matter of minutes even for non-experienced users. Simple step-by-step installing allows getting demo website with no problems.

Drupal Theme Features:
  • Modern & Clean Design perfect for portfolio
  • Responsive Layout
  • Drupal 8 Ready
  • jQuery Drop Down Menus
  • Font Awesome Integrated
  • 10+ Social Networks
  • Add Copyright Text
Documentation

All of our Drupal themes includes detailed Documentation or you can ask question connected with theme on our Forum

Premium Drupal Themes

To help support our open source projects we offer our Premium Drupal Theme Club. Club members get support for OrdaSoft related issues and access to our range of premium responsive Drupal themes.

Shiv

Drupal Themes News - Sun, 07/03/2016 - 12:23

The Shiv theme is starting point of theme and site development. Shiv theme is sub-theme of "Beginning" theme.

Theme is develop by Shivcharan Patil (Shiv) of shiv.work and itApplication.net.

Theme is actively developed and supported by developer on developer's off time.
If you would like to say thanks, buy a drink for developer

Photographer - Drupal One Page Portfolio Theme

Drupal Themes News - Thu, 06/30/2016 - 15:03

Our best Drupal one page portfolio theme Photographer now available on Drupal 8. Photographer Drupal portfolio theme is responsive & modern one page Drupal 8 theme based on Drupal Blank theme. Fully responsive layout makes it mobile friendly, this Drupal mobile theme will look equally great on tablets, mobile devices and laptops.

Photographer Drupal one page theme has a lot of customization options like social media integration, typography options (Google fonts integration), ability to insert your copyright, options for setting style for links, body and more.

Photographer Drupal template is perfect choice for all photographers, designers, illustrators, freelancers, creative agencies, web designers, animators and other creative people. If you are looking for creative and colorful portfolio to show your works don't miss Photographer Drupal portfolio theme, you definitely will like it.

Quickstart of Photographer - Drupal One Page Portfolio Theme in which all modules, theme and dummy data are included, is available here. It's easy to install Drupal website in a matter of minutes even for non-experienced users. Simple step-by-step installing allows getting demo website with no problems.

Drupal Theme Features:
  • Modern & Clean Design perfect for portfolio
  • Responsive Layout
  • Drupal 8 Ready
  • jQuery Drop Down Menus
  • Font Awesome Integrated
  • 10+ Social Networks
  • Add Copyright Text
Documentation

All of our Drupal themes includes detailed Documentation or you can ask question connected with theme on our Forum

Premium Drupal Themes

To help support our open source projects we offer our Premium Drupal Theme Club. Club members get support for OrdaSoft related issues and access to our range of premium responsive Drupal themes.

Drupal is for ambitious digital experiences

Drupal.org News - Wed, 06/29/2016 - 08:00

Republished from buytaert.net

What feelings does the name Drupal evoke? Perceptions vary from person to person; where one may describe it in positive terms as "powerful" and "flexible," another may describe it negatively as "complex." People describe Drupal differently not only as a result of their professional backgrounds, but also based on what they've heard and learned.

If you ask different people what Drupal is for, you'll get many different answers. This isn't a surprise, because over the years the answers to this fundamental question have evolved. Drupal started as a tool for hobbyists building community websites, but over time it's evolved to support large and sophisticated use cases.

Perception is everything

Perception is everything; it sets expectations and guides actions and inactions. We need to better communicate Drupal's identity, demonstrate its true value, and manage its perceptions and misconceptions. Words do lead to actions. Spending the time to capture what Drupal is for could energize and empower people to make better decisions when adopting, building, and marketing Drupal.

Truth be told, I've been reluctant to define what Drupal is for, as it requires making trade-offs. I've feared that we'd make the wrong choice or limit our growth. Over the years, it's become clear that not defining what Drupal is used for leaves more people confused, even within our own community.

For example, because Drupal evolved from a simple tool for hobbyists to a more powerful digital experience platform, many people believe that Drupal is now "for the enterprise." While I agree that Drupal is a great fit for the enterprise, I personally never loved that categorization. It's not just large organizations that use Drupal. Individuals, small startups, universities, museums, and non-profits can be equally ambitious in what they'd like to accomplish, and Drupal can be an incredible solution for them.

Defining what Drupal is for

Rather than using "for the enterprise," I thought "for ambitious digital experiences" was a good phrase to describe what people can build using Drupal. I say "digital experiences" because I don't want to confine this definition to traditional browser-based websites. As I've stated in my Drupalcon New Orleans keynote, Drupal is used to power mobile applications, digital kiosks, conversational user experiences, and more. Today I really wanted to focus on the word "ambitious."

"Ambitious" is a good word because it aligns with the flexibility, scalability, speed and creative freedom that Drupal provides. Drupal projects may be ambitious because of the sheer scale (e.g. The Weather Channel), their security requirements (e.g. The White House), the number of sites (e.g. Johnson & Johnson manages thousands of Drupal sites), or specialized requirements of the project (e.g. the New York MTA powering digital kiosks with Drupal). Organizations are turning to Drupal because it gives them greater flexibility, better usability, deeper integrations, and faster innovation. Not all Drupal projects need these features on day one—or needs to know about them—but it is good to have them in case you need them later on.

"Ambitious" also aligns with our community's culture. Our industry is in constant change (responsive design, web services, social media, IoT), and we never look away. Drupal 8 was a very ambitious release; a reboot that took one-third of Drupal's lifespan to complete, but maneuvered Drupal to the right place for the future that's now coming. I've always believed that the Drupal community is ambitious, and I believe that attitude remains strong in our community.

Last but not least, our adopters are also ambitious. They are using Drupal to transform their organizations digitally, leaving established business models and old business processes in the dust.

I like the position that Drupal is ambitious. Stating that Drupal is for ambitious digital experiences, however, is only a start. It only gives a taste of Drupal's objectives, scope, target audience, and advantages. I think we'd benefit from being much clearer. I'm curious to know how you feel about the term "for ambitious digital experiences" versus "for the enterprise" versus not specifying anything. Let me know in the comments so we can figure out how to collectively change the perception of Drupal.

PS: I'm borrowing the term "ambitious" from the Ember.js community. They use the term in their tagline and slogan on their main page.

Travel Zymphonies Theme

Drupal Themes News - Sat, 06/18/2016 - 20:30

Travel Zymphonies Theme is a useful theme for travel agency or tour operating website, with a focus on offering various adventure tour packages. It is completely responsive, along with a multiple layout for helping to create multiple pages based on your contents. This theme is completely free and contributed by Zymphonies team.

Theme Live Demo | More Advanced Themes

Follow us in Twitter & Like us on Facebook to get free/premium theme updates, Drupal tips, tricks & news

Theme designed by FreeBiezz.com & developed by Zymphonies.com

Features

  • Drupal 8 core
  • Font Awesome Icons
  • Bootstrap 3.x
  • Smooth CSS3 Animation
  • Responsive Drupal theme
  • Bootstrap typography
  • Option to show/hide credit
  • Two layout options – one sidebar and main content
  • Three column layout options – two sidebar and main content
  • Single column options – boxed and full-width
  • Four column footer links in all pages
  • Social media links (Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, LinkedIn, Pinterest and YouTube)

We highly recommend Travel Zymphonies theme for:

  • Travel Hotel Booking
  • Travel Agency Themes
  • Hotel Booking Themes
  • Travel Blog Themes
  • Other Travel Related Themes
  • Tour Operators and Hotels 
Slider/Banner Tutorial

How to create Slider/Banner in Zymphonies Drupal 8 Themes

Connect with Zymphonies Contact Zymphonies

Have Queries? Click here to contact Zymphonies

  • Free theme customization & additional features
  • Drupal custom theme development
  • Drupal website design & development
  • Drupal website migration

Sponsored by Zymphonies

Drupal 8.1.3 and 7.44 released

Drupal.org News - Wed, 06/15/2016 - 20:32

Drupal 8.1.3 and 7.44, maintenance releases which contain fixes for security vulnerabilities, are now available for download.

See the Drupal 8.1.3 and Drupal 7.44 release notes for further information.

Download Drupal 8.1.3 Download Drupal 7.44

Upgrading your existing Drupal 8 and 7 sites is strongly recommended. There are no new features or non-security-related bug fixes in these releases. For more information about the Drupal 8.1.x release series, consult the Drupal 8 overview. More information on the Drupal 7.x release series can be found in the Drupal 7.0 release announcement.

Security vulnerabilities

Drupal 8.1.3 and 7.44 were released in response to the discovery of security vulnerabilities. Details can be found in the official security advisory:

To fix the security vulnerabilities, please upgrade to either Drupal 8.1.3 or Drupal 7.44.

Change log

Drupal 8.1.3 is a security release only. For more details, see the 8.1.3 release notes. A complete list of all changes in the stable 8.1.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Drupal 7.44 is a security release only. For more details, see the 7.44 release notes. A complete list of all changes in the stable 7.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Update notes

See the 8.1.3 and 7.44 release notes for details on important changes in each release.

Known issues

See the 8.1.3 and 7.44 release notes for details on known issues affecting each release.

Security information

We have a security announcement mailing list and a history of all security advisories, as well as an RSS feed with the most recent security advisories. We strongly advise Drupal administrators to sign up for the list.

Drupal 8 and 7 include the built-in Update Manager module, which informs you about important updates to your modules and themes.

Bug reports

Both Drupal 8.1.x and 7.x are being maintained, so given enough bug fixes (not just bug reports) more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.

DrupalCI: Continuous Integration Testing for Drupal.org

Drupal.org News - Wed, 06/08/2016 - 23:40
Why test?

The goal of automated testing is confidence: confidence in application stability, and confidence that new features work as intended. Continuous integration as a philosophy is about speeding the rate of change while keeping stability. As the number of contributing programmers increase, the need to have automated testing as a means to prove stability increases.

This post is focused on how the automated testing infrastructure on Drupal.org works, not actually writing tests. Much more detail about how to write tests during Drupal development can be found in community documentation:

Categories of testing

DrupalCI essentially runs two categories of tests:

Functional tests (also called blackbox testing) are the most common type of test run on DrupalCI hardware. These tests run assertions that test functionality by installing Drupal with a fresh database and then exercising that installation by inserting data and confirming the assertions complete. Front-end tests and behavior driven tests (BDD) tend to be functional. Upgrade tests are a type of functional tests that run a full installation of Drupal, then run upgrade commands.

Unit tests run assertions that test a unit of code and do not require a database installation. This means they execute very quickly. Because of its architecture, Drupal 8 has much more unit test coverage than Drupal 7.

These test categories can be broken down further into more specific test types.

What testing means at the scale of Drupal

Drupal 8, with its 3,000+ core contributors and 7,288 contrib developers (so far), needs testing as a means to comfortably move forward code that everyone can trust to be stable.

Between January and May 2016, 90,364 test runs were triggered in DrupalCI. That is about 18,000 test runs requested per month. Maintainers set whether they want tests to run on demand, with every patch submitted, or nightly. They also determine what environments those tests will run on; there are 6 combinations of PHP and database engines available for maintainers to choose from.

The majority of these test runs are Drupal 8 tests at this point. (19,599 core tests and 47,713 contrib project tests were run during those 5 months.) Each test costs about 12 cents to run on Amazon Web Services. At the time of writing this post, we averaged around $2,000 per month in testing costs for our community. (Thank you supporters!)

An overly simple history of automated testing for Drupal

Automated testing first became a thing for Drupal contributed projects during Drupal version 4.5 with the introduction of the SimpleTest module. It was not until Drupal 6 that we started manually building out testbots and running these tests on Drupal.org hardware.

In Drupal 7, SimpleTest was brought into Drupal Core. (More information about what that took can be reviewed in the SimpleTest Roadmap for Drupal 7.)

In Drupal 8, PHPUnit testing was added to Drupal Core. PHPUnit tests are much faster than a full functional test in SimpleTest—though runtest.sh still triggers a combination of these test types in Drupal 8.

The actual implementation of automated testing was much more complicated than this history suggests. The original testbot infrastructure that ran for 7 years on Drupal.org hardware was manually managed by some fiercely dedicated volunteers. The manual nature of that maintenance led to the architecture of DrupalCI, which was meant to make it easier to test locally at first and later focused on autoscaling on powerful hardware that could plow through tests more quickly.

DrupalCI's basic structure

In The Drupal.org Complexity, we could see the intricate ways that Drupal's code base interacts with other parts of the system.

We could further break out how systems like DrupalCI are interrelated.

DrupalCI is a combination of data stored on Drupal.org, cron jobs, drush commands, and most importantly a couple of Jenkins installations to manage all the automation.

Jenkins is the open source automation server project that makes most of the system possible. We use it for automating our build process and deploying code to our dev, staging and production environments. It automates just about anything and is used by companies small and large to run continuous integration or continuous deployment for their applications. It's considered a "best practice" solution alongside options like Travis, CircleCI, and Bamboo. They all have slightly different features, but automation is at the core of most of these DevOps tools.

To provide continuously integrated tests, you need to trigger those tests at a moment when the tests will have the greatest value.

The three triggers for running a test job are when a patch is added to an issue comment, when code is committed to a repository or daily on a cron. Maintainers can specify which triggers are associated with which branches of their projects and which environments should run those tests.

For core these settings look something like this:

This detail allows for specific tests to run at specific times per the Drupal.org Testing Policy for DrupalCI.

To make this automation happen, we have an installation of Jenkins (Infrastructure Jenkins below) that is polled by Drupal.org once per minute with testing jobs to be queued.

These jobs live in a database record alongside Drupal.org.

Infrastructure Jenkins speaks to the CI Dispatcher (also Jenkins) where the testing queue regularly passes those jobs to available testbots. CI Dispatcher uses an Amazon Web Services EC2 plugin to spin up new testbots when no existing testbot is available. Each testbot can spin up Docker containers with the specific test images defined by the maintainer. Theses containers pull from DockerHub repositories with official combinations of PHP and database engines that Drupal supports.

After a testbot is running, the CI Dispatcher is in constant communication with the bots. You can even click through to the console on CI Dispatcher and watch the tests run. (It's not very exciting—perhaps we should add sound effects to the failures—but it is very handy.)

Once per minute, Drupal.org polls the CI Dispatcher for test status. It responds with pending, running, failed or passed. Failed and passed tests are then pulled back into Drupal.org for display using the Jenkins JSON API.

Tests can also be run on demand at the patch, commit or branch level using the handy "add test" and "retest" links.

Why did we build this ourselves? Why not use [insert testing platform here]

Lot's of people have asked why we don't use TravisCI, CircleCI or some other hosted testing solution. The short answer is that most publicly available testing systems require Github authentication and integration.

Additionally, our testing infrastructure is powerful because of its integration with our issue queues. Read the aforementioned The Drupal.org Complexity for more information.

Another reason to run our own testing is scale. To get through all of the core tests for Drupal 8 in an acceptable amount of time (about 44 mins on average), we run very large testbots. These bots have 2 processors with 8 hardware cores. With hyperthreading, that means we have 32 hardware execution threads—about 88 EC2 compute units. They are not exactly super computers, but they are very performant.

We average nearly 18,000 test runs per month. During our peak usage we spin up as many as 25 testbot machines—though usually we cap at 15 bots to keep costs under control. This helps us plow through our testing needs during sprints at DrupalCons and large camps.

We have explored using an enterprise licensed version of either Github or CircleCI with our own hardware to tackle testing. That same consideration has been given to SauceLabs for front-end testing. Right now, there is not a cost savings to tackle this migration, but that does not rule it out in the future. Testing services continues to evolve.

Accelerating Drupal 8

In my first months as CTO, I was told repeatedly that the most important thing for us to work on was testing for Drupal 8. In those early days as I built out the team, we were mostly focused on catching up from the Drupal 7 upgrade and tackling technical debt issues that cropped up. In DrupalCon Austin, I had members of my team learn how to maintain the testbot infrastructure so that we could take over the process of spinning up bots and dealing with spikes in demand.

By early 2015, we had optimized the old testbots as much as they were going to be optimized. We moved them to AWS so we could spin up faster machines and more bots, but there were features that were waiting on the new DrupalCI infrastructure that were blocking key development on Drupal 8.

In March of 2015, we invited all the community developers that had helped with DrupalCI to the Drupal Association offices in Portland and sprinted with them to figure out the remaining implementation needs. The next couple of months involved tweaking DrupalCI's architecture and cutting out any nice to have features to get something launched as soon as possible.
It is no coincidence that from the time of DrupalCI's launch until the release of Drupal 8, progress was rapidly accelerated.

I am immensely proud of the work of all the community members and staff that worked directly with core maintainers to unblock Drupal 8 development and make it faster. This work was critical.

Thank you to jthorson, ricardoamaro, nick_schuch, dasrecht, basicisntall, drumm, mikey_p, mixologic, hestenet, chx, mile23, alexpott, dawehner, Shyamala, and webchick. You all made DrupalCI. (And huge apologies to all those I'm undoubtedly leaving out.) Also thank you to anyone who chimed in on IRC or in the issue queues to help us track down bugs and improve the service.

What's next for testing Drupal

Most of the future state of testing is outlined in the Drupal.org Testing Policy for DrupalCI.

Key issues that we still need to solve are related to concurrent testing improvements and new test types to support. While we have PhantomJS integrated with the test runner, there are optimizations that need to happen.

Testing is not an endpoint. Like much of our work, it is an ongoing effort to continuously improve Drupal by providing a tool that improves how we test, what we test, and when we test.

Openfed CMS Adminimal Theme

Drupal Themes News - Tue, 06/07/2016 - 17:46

Subtheme of Adminimal for use in the Openfed distribution

Matthew Lechleider Community Spotlight

Drupal.org News - Tue, 06/07/2016 - 15:38

Matthew Lechleider (Slurpee) has been active in the Drupal community for over a decade, and his hard work has directly led to an incredible amount of community growth. The founder of a Chicago Drupal User Group and our community’s chief advocate for the Google Summer of Code and Google Code-In programs, Matthew has been a key part of growing the Drupal project and our global community. Here's his Drupal story.

“In 2005, I was a full-time university student working at an internet service provider so I could put myself through school,” Matthew said. “I was working as a network/systems person, and since I was at an ISP we had a lot of people calling us and asking the same questions over and over. At the time, I knew bit about web development and programming, and I thought, ‘I bet I could make a website that would answer these people’s questions.’ And that’s how I found Drupal. I proposed it to my boss, and the next thing I knew I was working on a full-time project getting paid to work with Drupal 4. I built the website and it was really popular— and we noticed that the phone calls went down. We were tracking our support calls at the 24-hour call center, and when people called for help, we would refer them to the website as a resource. So it really was a big help."

After that, the next steps were logical for Matthew. He put together a Drupal meet-up at his Chicago-based company. The group grew quickly each month, and in no time at all, people were asking about training and “Introduction to Drupal” classes. "I started teaching those classes,” Matthew said, "and then next thing you know, people were asking for private trainings and businesses were asking me to come to their offices and train new Drupal developers. When the people I was training came back with advanced questions, I realized how much money they were making, so in 2008 I went from being a network engineer to focusing on Drupal full-time. Since then, I’ve started a Drupal business and worked on some very big projects."

"I never thought I would be a web developer, but I fell into Drupal, saw how great and easy it was, and decided it was a good thing to be a part of,” Matthew added.

Over his time in Drupal, Matthew has converted a lot of Chicagoan web developers into Drupal users. “It's pretty cool to be part of something bigger than yourself,” Matthew said. “It's like a big tidal wave — I feel like I’ve been riding this Drupal wave for a long time. I didn’t think I’d still be work with Drupal this many years later."

Why Slurpee?

Many people in the community know Matthew only by his user username, Slurpee. But how did he come by that handle?

"I was probably eight or nine years old, learning about computers, and I had some nicknames I was playing around with. But it’s like that movie ‘Hackers’: you have to have your handle, you have to have your identity. It was the middle of a hot July in the summer, and as I was figuring out what I should call myself, I realized I had bout 20 empty slurpee cups surrounding my computer. I really do like slurpees. So that’s where that came from."

Drupal 8

As a long-time Drupal user and evangelist, Matthew is incredibly excited for Drupal 8.

" I have a traditional programming background in computer science, and Drupal wasn’t always the most professional CMS,” Matthew said. “Now, I’m very excited about Drupal 8— it’s like Drupal grew up and went to college and got a graduate degree. Drupal 8 is the way Drupal should have been a long time ago. I’ve built some of the biggest Drupal projects in the world, and when you’re talking to those kinds of massive clients, it’s hard to sell systems like Drupal four, five, and six. They’re out paying the big money for the huge enterprise solutions, and Drupal 8 is big. It’s ready to go, and I really think it's on par with everything else these days."

When asked about his favorite Drupal 8 feature, Matthew said, “As I work with big sites, it’s been a big struggle to deal with continuous integration, which is resolved in Drupal 8. As a person with a sysadmin background, I think integration is probably the thing that will save the most headaches. It’s going to be a very cool tool to work with."

Google Summer of Code and Google Code-In

Matthew is also heavily involved in several of Google’s student coding programs, and runs point on keeping Drupal in the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) and Google Code-In (GCI) programs.

“I’m a bit younger than other people in the community, and I started with Drupal when I was 19 years old or so. I was going to college when I got into Drupal, and I remember talking to people about it at school... and nobody had any clue about it, not even my teachers,” Matthew said. “Fast forward several years: I was working in the community, specifically on the VoIP Drupal module suite. At the time, we had a student come to us about GSoC —this was in 2012— and he said, ‘hey, I want to work on this project for you guys as part of the GSoC. Can you be a mentor?’ I said sure, and that’s all I was that first year. The next year, nobody wanted to organize GSoC for Drupal, so I stepped up and said that I liked the program and would get the ball rolling. I spent a lot of time revamping the things that Drupal does with Google, got us accepted back into the program, and we’ve been participating every year since, both in the Google Summer of Code, which is for university students, and the Google Code-In, which is for students ages 13 through 17.

“Getting back to what I said earlier about being a student, when nobody knew what Drupal was, it was a bit harder to get involved. Knowing that there’s a program like this in schools around the world, pushing these projects to students, I think it’s critical for us to participate. If we want this project to continue to be successful, we have to focus on younger people. They’re the ones who are adapting and changing the tech as we know it, and if they don’t know about Drupal, they won’t use it. But if we embrace these kids and show them how awesome Drupal can be — we have impressive students doing impressive stuff— it’s great for everyone. That’s why I think it’s super important that we spend so much time on the GSoC and GCI programs."

For those who are interested in getting involved, there are both GSoC and GCI Drupal Groups, a documentation guide for GCI, and a guide for the GSoC students who are just getting started. There is also a #drupal-google IRC channel on free node.

“It’s fairly easy to get involved,” Matthew said. “If you’re interested in helping, join the groups — we send out lots of updates — or you can can contact me directly. You can find us on IRC, or if you know of a student who wants to get involved, all they need to do is read the documentation. It covers everything. We spent a lot of time on that documentation,” Matthew said.

Being part of something bigger

When asked what drives him to participate and organize the community, Matthew’s answer was simple.

"Honestly, it’s all about being part of something bigger than myself,” he said. "I’ve been participating in computer hacker nerd groups since I was a kid, and back then (in the 90s) it was fairly difficult to find out about these kinds of groups. I attended something called 2600 — does anyone else remember that? — I thought it was so cool to be a part of something like that. I’ve been in IRC every day for over 20 years participating in communities, and it’s so exciting to be part of a huge thing bigger than myself. Now I’m getting recognized for it in Drupal, which is cool,” he added.

"Drupal is by far the largest community I’ve participated in from that point of view, and it’s been an exciting ride. Honestly, I thought it would have been over by now — I’ve been part of the community for over 10 years and that’s a long time — but I’m excited to see where it goes. For me, Drupal is more of a lifestyle than a career. Technically I’m a web developer, but I spend so much of my time volunteering and going to events. I can go to a DrupalCon in another country and see my friends from all over the world. Seeing how mature our community has become over the past decade continues to excite me, and and I plan to be part of this for as long as possible."

“The money’s not bad either,” he added. “I live a comfortable life working from home. I like to travel a lot, go to music festivals, or go on Phish tour for weeks at a time, but I can still work. I have a mobile hotspot, and just bring my laptop with me. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been set up at a camping spot in the middle of nowhere, working on my laptop, or how many times I’ve been in a random country looking for internet so I can get some work done.”

“Working remotely, or working from home, gives me a lot of freedom. It lets me go to the skate park when all the kids are at school— I skateboard, and bring my board with me when I travel — and there’s time for me to go running every day. It’s actually one of my favorite activities, my running break — halfway through the day, I get up and I go running. It helps me keep my sanity."

"I also like to snowboard,” Matthew continued. “I’ve been skateboarding since I was 5 — since I could walk and talk I’ve been skateboarding — and I started snowboarding a couple years after that. Going to DrupalCon Denver was exciting, and there was a DrupalCon snowboard trip. Lots of people went to Breckenridge together, and that’s the other cool thing about the community: these people are fun, they like to go out and do things together."

Helping camps and communities around the world

After a decade in the Drupal community, Matthew has a lot of great memories of traveling, teaching, and sharing.

“I was invited to organize the first DrupalCamp in Sri Lanka and hold training classes there,” Matthew said. “It’s an island just off the coast of India, and when I went in 2012, they had just finished having a civil war. I was one of the only foreigners there, and there was military presence walking around. I wasn’t allowed to leave my hotel unless the Drupal people came and picked me up, and they were absolutely wonderful. They were so nice and appreciative, and so many people were incredibly smart and really talented. After I did a training or presentation, they all had a million questions and we ended up talking for hours. And that was when I had an ‘aha!’ moment and really felt like I was part of something bigger. It drove home that it’s my responsibility to spread the word of Drupal as much as possible."

“That was actually one of the trainings that I did when I was traveling a lot” Matthew added. “I literally traveled for years living out of hostels, and couch surfing. I was being contracted at the time to go teach Drupal in Europe, Asia, and Australia."

And for Matthew, one of his proudest accomplishments is Drupal’s participation in the GSoC and GCI programs.

"I think it’s cool that I maintain Drupal’s relationship with Google,” he said. "It’s Google. They’re the biggest tech company ever, and I have this relationship with multiple people at their offices. They’re all super nice and it’s great that they’re pushing this open source stuff. They want our community's feedback, and I think it’s really cool that I can represent Drupal with Google. They’re trying to give us money and get us to do more with the students. It’s something I think is really great."

The importance of networking

When asked if he had any advice for new Drupal users, Matthew had several thoughts to share.

“Find your local communities and participate,” he advised. “Go to as many events as you can. If you have to drive a couple of hours to go to a Drupal camp, do it. If there isn’t a local community in your area, start one. If you go to meetup.com and post a similar topic, even if just one other person shows up, that’s cool and the community will grow. Drupal is a software, but it helps to get some face time in with other people. Network. Go out. Have some coffee (or beer). Hang out. Bring your laptop and start sharing ideas— you’ll be surprised at how welcoming the Drupal community is. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve sat at the bar until the bar kicked us out just helping people fix websites and giving free training.

“If you’re struggling, it’s important to network with other groups — non-Drupal groups — like a web-dev group or an open source group or a Linux group or something. That’s what helped me when I did the first Drupal camp for Chicago 2008. We were thinking 100 people might show up, but we did a lot of networking. I contacted every tech user group in Milwaukee, Detroit, southern Illinois, and Minnesota. I found every group that was related to web or open source or Drupal, and I contacted every one of their organizers. Within a couple weeks we had over 200 registrations, and people were emailing us about hotels and hotel accommodations. It was a big wow moment for us."

As for those who are involved in the community and want to do more, Matthew has a few tips.

“If you want to teach training, my advice is not to focus on the curriculum. Everywhere I go, everyone wants me to submit my curriculum. I’ve taught a lot of classes, and I’ve learned that every group of students is going to be different. I can’t tell you how many times I had a curriculum and thought I was going to go through the whole thing, and instead I wind up talking about something else. Make sure you understand your students, and teach them what they want to learn about.

“And it’s not even all that difficult,” he added. “Here’s what I do for Global Training Days. You know what happens when you make an event that’s free anything? You get all sorts of people registering. So I keep the classes as small as possible — so whenever anybody registers for the event, I don’t give them the address unless they give me their phone number. When someone registers, I call them and ask them, 'what do you want to get from this training,' 'what is your experience,' — and I can’t tell you how many people have thanked me for that. Requiring a phone call with the registration helped keep the classes smaller, and limit it to people who were actually new to Drupal and would be in proper context of attending a GTD. So, that’s my advice — know your audience. Don’t assume everyone knows about Drupal. Don’t worry about a set curriculum — go with what you students are actually looking to gain from the experience."

For those who are looking for more tips, tricks, and knowledge from Matthew, his wisdom will soon be available at your fingertips in paperback form.

“I’m working with Packt publishing on a collection of ‘Drupal 8 Administration Cookbook Recipes.’ They’re step-by-step tutorials that teach admins to do everything from getting started with Drupal to doing advanced site building stuff, and it's coming out in later this summer. I’m pretty excited about it! I’ve always read a lot of the Drupal books and I’m excited to make a contribution. I started on my own but have had a Drupal business for several years, and have had several people who have worked for me. The book is literally just a collection of all the same questions every client always asks. It’s almost like a tell-all: here’s step-by-step documentation for how to do everything. Now stop asking us,” he added with a laugh.

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